Six of the best checked shirts for men

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A checked shirt is one of the staples of every man’s wardrobe. Whilst it will never stun and make you stand out from a crowd, it’s a basic that can be styled for a casual and yet fashionable look. Here we are going to look at six of the best checked shirt styles men can choose from.

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Buffalo Checked Shirts

This is the original checked shirt. It has its origins in workwear designs and has long since been the go to shirt for bad boys around the world. What makes a buffalo checked shirt is a striped fabric made up of large squares. It’s both simple and effective, coming in a range of colours. Red and black is normally the most popular colour choice.

Madras Checked Shirts

The name of this shirt is actually in reference to the fabric and not the check print. It’s a lightweight shirt because of the cotton it’s crafted from. Because of the more unique texture of the shirt, it can be an upgrade to the classic Buffalo shirt that many men go for.

Gingham Checked Shirts

Gingham is probably the neatest and smartest checked shirt for men. There are a number of Farah shirts in gingham print available here https://www.ejmenswear.com/men/farah. Originally the shirt choice for British mods thanks to the designer Ben Sherman, this shirt has now made it into smart casual wardrobes for men.

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Tartan Checked Shirts

Tartan originated in Scotland and quickly made its way into big fashion houses like Barbour, Burberry and Vivienne Westwood. It’s become a truly fashionable pattern that is distinct in its styles and colours. This beautiful design looks has just as much impact on your favourite checked shirt cut as it does on a kilt.

Windowpane Checked Shirts

With a distinguished patterns, the squares of the windowpane checked shirt stand out over the different coloured background of the shirt. It makes a great piece for grabbing attention, but it can be quite difficult to style and pull off.

Tattersall Checked Shirts

This checked shirt started its days in the 18th century as a pattern for horse blankets. You can spot the check pattern a mile away because it’s a unique combination of slim horizontal stripes with vertical stripes. The shirt is a firm favourite for British outdoorwear.

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